Weekly Photo Challenge: Mountains


From my viewpoint on the shores of Loch Lomond I can see clear across to Ben Lomond (Scottish Gaelic: Beinn Laomainn, ‘Beacon Mountain’), which is 974 metres (3,196 ft) high. With a distinctive shape, the mountain, which is in the Scottish Highlands, is easy to pick out no matter where you stand around Loch Lomond to view it. Situated on the eastern shore of the loch, it is the most southerly of the Munros. A Munro is a mountain in Scotland with a height over 3,000 ft (914.4 m). They are named after Sir Hugh Munro, 4th Baronet (1856–1919), who produced the first list of such hills, known as Munros Tables, in 1891. A Munro top is a summit over 3,000 ft which is not regarded as a separate mountain. As of the 2009, revision of the tables, published by the Scottish Mountaineering Club, there are 283 Munros and 227 further subsidiary tops. The most well-known Munro is Ben Nevis, the highest mountain in the British Isles, with an altitude of 1,344 metres (4,409 ft). The Munros of Scotland are known for presenting challenging conditions to hikers, particularly in winter when a number of fatalities are reported each year. Nevertheless, a popular practice amongst hillwalkers is “Munro Bagging”, the aim being to climb all of the listed Munros.

Ben Lomond lies within the Ben Lomond National Memorial Park and the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park, property of the National Trust for Scotland.

Pictured in this image is Rooney, a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, who loves water. We live beside the sea and everyday on his walk, he’s in for a quick swim…..

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22 comments

    • Thank you so much for your kind comment. He does like to go in the water and cool of. At home when I walk him down by the shore he makes a bee-line straight for the sea to paddle.

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