Weekly Photo Challenge: Rool Of Thurds


“Roolz is Roolz”, but, as is often the case, Roolz are there to be broken. I mean, c’mon…how long has that Rool of Thurds been around?

According to Wikipedia – The rule of thirds was first written down by John Thomas Smith in 1797. In his book Remarks on Rural Scenery, Smith quotes a 1783 work by Sir Joshua Reynolds, in which Reynolds discusses, in unquantified terms, the balance of dark and light in a painting. Smith then continues with an expansion on the idea, naming it the “Rule of Thirds”.

So this week I’m going to play whilst still conforming to the Rool of Thurds

Rule of Thirds

When I said play, I meant with textures and borders. However as you can see the Cross is in the left hand third of the photograph, the centre of the cross is on the top third and the horizon is on the bottom third. As you can guess by now I’m struggling to say a lot about the photograph for this weeks challenge. So instead here’s a little ditty I found about the Rool of Thurds

A normal person sees a storm, thinks help and runs away
A photographer sees that storm, and runs the other way
Off into the cold they go, the wind, the rain and more
To capture pics no matter what, of all the things they saw
Watching all the huge waves crashing, defiantly they stand
Looking out from beneath the pier, with camera in hand
Why do we do such stupid things, like photograph the snow
We can’t resist to get that pic, so off we always go
We see the world through rule of thirds, and many shades of grey
The search to get the perfect shot, continues every day
Dean Thorpe – The poem: “The photographer” by Dean Thorpe.

5 thoughts on “Weekly Photo Challenge: Rool Of Thurds

  1. petspeopleandlife February 28, 2015 / 00:54

    Well, rule of thirds is all good and I’m not a pro but I see no good reason why the rule must remain in place at all times. Excellent example, Mike, of the rule of thirds.

    Like

  2. Mike Hardisty February 28, 2015 / 20:14

    One of the biggest photographs hanging on my wall 120 cm x 80 cm breaks all the rules, especially the Rule of Thirds.

    Like

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