An Apology


It’s more than likely that you received a Temporary Post from me on Thursday as a result of me changing the theme I use for Say It With A Camera. Regular readers will know that I use Windows Live Writer to write my blogs and when WLW adopts the new theme it sometimes sends out a temporary post. It’s almost like a spam message, because there are no photographs, just some text within the email, followed by a load of numbers.

This is a temporary post that was not deleted. Please delete this manually. (28833f2c-9186-4ba0-8af7-76e97ce3ff17 – 3bfe001a-32de-4114-a6b4-4005b770f6d7)

I can only apologise for this, we all lead busy lives, and an unwanted email in our inbox is all something we could do without.

I had some great news this week. Say It With A Camera has been awarded a place in the Top 100 Photography Blogs by Feedspot, a service that lets you read all your favourite blogs in one place. I must be doing something right.

And so to some photographs. I’ve just come back from Dunham Massey, another one of Britain’s Stately Homes that is managed by the National Trust. So here’s some photographs from inside the house.

Just before you go into the house proper, there’s a room with this nice old car.

Vintage Car

Not sure if it’s still being driven on the road but there is mud on the tires and the wheel arches, maybe it does. Once inside the house, like nearly all National Trust properties, you get the chance to wander around the state rooms and usually the servants quarters. It’s usually quite difficult to get a photograph because you’re not allowed to use flash (none on my camera, anyway), and tripods are also not allowed. Not only that, there’s always people walking around, looking at the rooms. So, as a photographer, if you want photographs with no one in sight, you have to be patient and ready to click that shutter as soon as a room becomes empty.

Dining Room

Just like in the photograph below, I waited ages and suddenly, an empty room. Maybe not the best angle but I’ve got a photograph I can use.

Green Settees

The next room is a bit of a strange one. I’m not quite sure what function it has. It looks more like a room a lady would use, but I was so intent on getting the photograph I forgot to look and see what it was used for. What do you think? A room for the lady of the house?

Room

Not too hard to know what the next one is used for. It’s a study and definitely a mans room.

Study

Right, let’s go below stairs now. Into the kitchen. Sometimes I think the National Trust over decorate rooms. Just too much on the tables and work surfaces. But it does give an insight to typical items used in a kitchen of a stately home.

Kitchen

Again another room I forgot to take a note of it’s use. It looks like the servants dining room. That’s another thing about the National trust, they leave signs and things explaining what is going on. As a visitor it’s great because it lets you know all about the room. As a photographer I hate them, much too hard to clone them out, but they ruin the aesthetic of the room.

Dining Room

On to the laundry now. The tubs on the floor are where items were washed, Those wooden objects with the funny legs were effectively the agitator for the wash tubs. All done by hand, real hard work. Then there’s the mangle in the forefront of the photograph, used to wring out the washing. No tumble dryers here……

Laundry Room

….and this was the drying room. Missing from this photograph is all the washing hanging from the ceiling.

Laundry

Well that’s it. I hope you enjoyed the photographs and once again my apologies for the spurious post you received yesterday – Mike

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10 comments

  1. I love the curiosity you ignite with your photography. Reminds me a bit of Downton Abbey. I always wandered to wander around the kitchen and feel the same way in your photos. Always a pleasure. PS. No worries about yesterday, I don’t think you chased anyone away. Wink.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Jane. I did sort of make these “soft” to give a more worldly feel to them. I think razor-sharp photographs are great for landscapes, wildlife etc, but a little bit of glow for inside buildings just seems to look better to me.

      Like

  2. Lovely Photographs Mike, and I know exactly what you mean by those pesky signs ruining the aesthetic. The one you think is the ladies room – what is that strange structure with all the feathers flying off it?
    Alison

    Liked by 1 person

    • I have no idea, Alison. Unfortunately I was surprised to find the room with no one in that I fired off the shutter for the photographs and then went to the next room very quickly before anyone came. I didn’t stop to read about the room, which I normally do when I’m waiting to get a photograph.

      Liked by 1 person

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