Hôtel-Dieu, Beaune

Once an alms-house for the poor, the Hotel Dieu is now a museum and at last I have found an ancient building in France that is not bare of furniture and fittings. Right from the start I knew there would be some good photo opportunities and it really was a shame that the sun wasn’t out. Instead i had to contend with gloomy grey skies throughout the day. But it’s a one-off visit so I had to make the most of it, stop moaning about the light and get on with it.

Courtyard

Of course like all museums and tourist attractions you just can’t get away from the crowds and this particular group always seemed to be just in front of me. But ignore the people and look at the ceiling. How beautiful is that?

The Ward

Those beds are were the sick and poor were quartered. Privacy, of which there is little, comes from drawing a curtain across. But when all’s said and done, it must have been a lot better to be in here, rather than being out on the streets.

Beds

So I finally had a stunning plan. Jump ahead of that group and stay ahead of them whilst I got my photographs. there were other people about but I could work around that. meanwhile I’m impressed with the level of fittings that are here in the museum, even down to the mannequins dressed as nuns. Although more on that later……

Private Ward

….and here’s where I think the mannequin doesn’t work. Red lipstick, beautifully shaped eye-brows, any nuns I’ve seen, and I’ve seen loads, having once lived very near Rome and the Vatican, just didn’t look like that.

Kitchen

But the museum is well equipped and although I photographed a lot of rooms there’s only so much I can include here. Which takes me to the Apothecary. I could spend time in Photoshop cloning out the ropes and the sign with the number but I wanted to get this post out. Besides which you get to see the room as I did and that’s how it should be.

Apothecary

Anyway after a while I left the Hotel Dieu and went for a wander around Beaune. Such a nice little town, Narrow cobbled streets to walk around, not too much traffic and a lot of building associated with the wine industry, including a free museum you can walk around.

Streets

And of course, there’s always a church. As I had time to spare. I had a quick wander around

Basilique Notre Dame

It’s a typical French church, pretty ornate inside, with high vaulted ceiling and lots of stained glass.

Dome

Like most French churches, there are lots of private chapels, some very ornate, some quite simple.

Stained Glass

Well that’s it. I hope you enjoyed this quick tour with me – Mike

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Château de Tournon

Once again I am disappointed by a French historical building that promised much and delivered so little.

Tournon Castle

Perched above the town of Tournon, the castle has views over the town and river.

View From

Inside though another historical building has been stripped of much of it’s original fixtures and fittings, only to be replaced by modern works of art.

Art Work

Nice as some of them are to look at, you can soon get bored wandering from room to room and finding only these. Where is all the magnificent furniture, the drapes, ornaments etc. I mean you only have to read about some of the historical homes I have photographed in the UK to see the difference. Despite being built during the 16th century the Castle at Tournon has so little. Even Wikipedia in it’s description of Tournon Castle strips it down to one lineittle. Even Wikipedia strips it down to one line.

The Château de Tournon is a listed castle in Tournon-sur-Rhône, Ardèche, France. It was built in the 16th century. It has been listed as an official historical monument since March 28, 1938

Anyway let’s have a look around the castle. After paying your entry fee the first thing you get to see is the courtyard. Like all museums there is a sort of suggested route and entry to the rooms of the castle are through the small door. We struggled to find the light switch at this point and you do need it, especially as you are met with a winding staircase. Also coming in from the bright sunlight to this dark area, you are at first as “blind as a bat”.

Castle Courtyard

First room, mind the step, you have to step down into the room. Lots of shields on the wall.

Shields

Through the door into the next room. There’s a table and two chairs. Moving on quickly….

A Room

At this point I stopped following the plan. Up until this point I was by myself and could take my time taking photographs. But suddenly a part of people turned up so I jumped ahead to other rooms to get some peace and quiet to photograph. Later I can double back once they have passed through. It’s one of those things, you can’t expect exclusive access when visiting buildings…..but there is always one who wants to linger and look at the carving on the clock. I mean ten minutes just to look at it, c’mon give me a break.

Furniture

Another table and chairs……

Desk

….and here’s some more

Table and Chairs

viewed from another angle.

Table

In one of the rooms, there was a large glass case with what looked like some remains of a bridge. Remember Marc Seguin? I couldn’t photograph it, because there was a party of people there being given a lecture by one of the museums curators so time to move on. I found the church. Yep! That’s it below. Enough said.

Church

That’s it for Tournon Castle. Another disappointment, although that’s not strictly true. I did enjoy wandering around, especially as it got me out of the heat of the day.

Macon, Is That It?

Wander around Macon in France and you’ll soon come to recognise that it does not offer a lot for photographers. Maybe I’m doing the town an injustice but without stretching to a bit of street photography I was really struggling to get a photograph. Now half of the problem was cars. They were parked everywhere and any building that was worth a click of the shutter had the inevitable car outside it. So I became a bit selective, maybe too selective, but it is what it is so here’s the photographs.

Chamber of Commerce

The first building I came across was the Chamber of Commerce, which seemed to be shut up. Getting low and close to the waterfall allowed me to get all of the building in, but I did have to do some perspective corrections in Adobe Lightroom to straighten the building.

Quite a few of streets are closed to traffic or so I thought. When I nearly stepped into the path of speeding moped I soon realised, there’s traffic and there’s traffic. But eventually I managed to negotiate my way to the Town Hall and those crazy but colourful plant pots.

Hotel de Ville

And right behind me was the Eglise St Pierre. I couldn’t get all of the building in with one shot. It was just too tall. So in the end I photographed the church in three sections, making sure each section overlapped by quite a bit. Then It was a simple task to combine the three sections using Adobe Lightroom’s “merge to panorama” module.

Eglise St Pierre

Inside the church, like many French churches, it’s quite ornate. Far more so than many of the simple churches I find in North Wales. There again, the churches in France are so much larger, almost cathedral-like in size.

Columns

Here’s a close-up of the area around the altar. Before you ask I have no idea of the significance of the green cloth. From a photography point of view id does add a welcome splash of colour.

Green Cloth

Sorry about this, but talking about cathedrals, Macon does have one. Well actually it has two. The 13th century one was demolished in 1799 leaving only two distinctive towers. Lot’s of cars parked outside so not worth a photograph. Then there’s the new cathedral of St Vincent.

Cathedrale St Vincent

Now if you want ornate, this is the place to go. All marble, lots of stained glass, well just look at it.

Ornate

So that’s Macon. No doubt I missed loads that I could photograph but to be honest as a town it didn’t really inspire me

Llanrwst And I Got Wet

Now you might have noticed that I’ve changed the blog theme and there’s a reason behind that. I had a conversation the other day with a new reader to Say It With A Camera and after a while it became evident to me that somehow the aim for my blog had sort of gone by the wayside. Say It With A Camera was always intended to be about the photographs and yet there was I using a theme that spent more time advertising how I’d been Discovered, Freshly Pressed and in the Top 100 Blogs. You know I can’t even remember if that was photography or not. Worst of all, the photographs were small.

So I’ve gone back to a simple theme called Plane, taken out all the Widgets to give me a single column that hopefully will show the photographs so much better. Talking of photographs. All of these are 3 shot HDR using the Olympus combination of the OM-D E-M1 Mk2 and the 12-40mm f2.8 PRO lens which is hardly ever off of the E-M1.

Anyway it’s that time of the year when the “little house” by the river in Llanrwst becomes probably one of the most photographed buildings in North Wales.

Tu Hwnt I'r Bont
1/180s, f11, ISO 200

The building does have a chequered history but it’s a tea room now and a very popular one at that. Oh! and the getting wet. First of all the river is in full flow, higher than normal. I came along the river side and had to wade across a large puddle were the river had burst it’s banks. Then to cap it all. I’d just got the tripod set up, the camera was on the tripod and suddenly the heavens opened. Driving rain and where I was standing there is just no shelter.

Not really that productive down by the river, so whilst I was in the area I decided to pay a quick visit to the church, more to dry out a little before going back to the car, than actually taking any photographs.

But seen as I was there, why not? The light wasn’t too bad, late afternoon sun, breaking through the clouds, giving some nice patches of light and shade, ideal for a bit of HDR. Just as a matter of interest the church was built in the late 15th century, although there have been more modern renovations to the church which were carried out in the 1840’s.

Church of St Grwst
2.0s, f11, ISO 200

Next door to the church is a small chapel which was built in the 17th century by Richard Wynn of Gwydir. Inside the chapel you can find 17th century stalls, a lectern and a communion table. Several stone monuments, dedicated to members of the Wynn family, as well as a 13th century stone coffin, supposedly that of Llywelyn the Great can be found.

Gwydir Chapel
1/40s, f8, ISO 200

So that’s it. All in all I got wet and to add insult to injury, walking back to the car the heaven opened again. Then to add even more insult. As soon as I left Llanrwst, the sun came out, the skies turned blue, with those beautiful white wispy clouds. It would have been perfect down by the river, especially with the sun starting to dip. But that’s the weather in Wales for you.

An Apology

It’s more than likely that you received a Temporary Post from me on Thursday as a result of me changing the theme I use for Say It With A Camera. Regular readers will know that I use Windows Live Writer to write my blogs and when WLW adopts the new theme it sometimes sends out a temporary post. It’s almost like a spam message, because there are no photographs, just some text within the email, followed by a load of numbers.

This is a temporary post that was not deleted. Please delete this manually. (28833f2c-9186-4ba0-8af7-76e97ce3ff17 – 3bfe001a-32de-4114-a6b4-4005b770f6d7)

I can only apologise for this, we all lead busy lives, and an unwanted email in our inbox is all something we could do without.

I had some great news this week. Say It With A Camera has been awarded a place in the Top 100 Photography Blogs by Feedspot, a service that lets you read all your favourite blogs in one place. I must be doing something right.

And so to some photographs. I’ve just come back from Dunham Massey, another one of Britain’s Stately Homes that is managed by the National Trust. So here’s some photographs from inside the house.

Just before you go into the house proper, there’s a room with this nice old car.

Vintage Car

Not sure if it’s still being driven on the road but there is mud on the tires and the wheel arches, maybe it does. Once inside the house, like nearly all National Trust properties, you get the chance to wander around the state rooms and usually the servants quarters. It’s usually quite difficult to get a photograph because you’re not allowed to use flash (none on my camera, anyway), and tripods are also not allowed. Not only that, there’s always people walking around, looking at the rooms. So, as a photographer, if you want photographs with no one in sight, you have to be patient and ready to click that shutter as soon as a room becomes empty.

Dining Room

Just like in the photograph below, I waited ages and suddenly, an empty room. Maybe not the best angle but I’ve got a photograph I can use.

Green Settees

The next room is a bit of a strange one. I’m not quite sure what function it has. It looks more like a room a lady would use, but I was so intent on getting the photograph I forgot to look and see what it was used for. What do you think? A room for the lady of the house?

Room

Not too hard to know what the next one is used for. It’s a study and definitely a mans room.

Study

Right, let’s go below stairs now. Into the kitchen. Sometimes I think the National Trust over decorate rooms. Just too much on the tables and work surfaces. But it does give an insight to typical items used in a kitchen of a stately home.

Kitchen

Again another room I forgot to take a note of it’s use. It looks like the servants dining room. That’s another thing about the National trust, they leave signs and things explaining what is going on. As a visitor it’s great because it lets you know all about the room. As a photographer I hate them, much too hard to clone them out, but they ruin the aesthetic of the room.

Dining Room

On to the laundry now. The tubs on the floor are where items were washed, Those wooden objects with the funny legs were effectively the agitator for the wash tubs. All done by hand, real hard work. Then there’s the mangle in the forefront of the photograph, used to wring out the washing. No tumble dryers here……

Laundry Room

….and this was the drying room. Missing from this photograph is all the washing hanging from the ceiling.

Laundry

Well that’s it. I hope you enjoyed the photographs and once again my apologies for the spurious post you received yesterday – Mike

Order, Order, Order

I was thinking about what to do with this weeks challenge, probably far too long, here we are Tuesday afternoon and I still haven’t written anything. But regular readers will know that I’m often on the last-minute.

Right now I’m starting to prepare for a talk I’m due to give next month about wildlife and aircraft I’ve photographed, entitled “Wings And Things”, my title not the clients.

I’m slowly working through a series of photographs, identifying ones that I could possibly use. Later on I will narrow it down and then start to build the presentation.

So to this weeks challenge….

The Kitchen

All those copper pans, that would be my idea of hell, trying to clean them after use. Imagine the poor scullery maid who would have to clean everything after a dinner party in the house.

Talking of dinner parties, everything neatly laid out on the table from cutlery, crockery, table decorations, even the chairs. Setting a formal table means that every place setting should be exactly the same. Butlers would often use a measuring device to ensure that everything on the table was in its exact place, to the millimetre. There is pride in getting it just right and rightly so.

Dining Room

Book after book, all neatly filed on the shelves. I sometimes wonder if they’ve all been read or where they just for show.

The Library

That’s it for this week. Here’s what other bloggers have to say about this weeks challenge.

Gwyncurbygodwin’s Blog LIBRARY
Pecking Order – Wind Kisses
Photography- Finding Beauty in the Order of Disorder – Sumyanna Writes
Order and Creativity – Susan Rushton
Pictures without film. Bobbins – Weekly Photo Challenge- Order
Life is for Living Every Day And you thought you had one up on this Granny … definitely not!
Made to order, made in order – The Chaos Within
Books, Music, Photography, & Movies WPC- Order
Photo Challenge- Order – Figments of a DuTchess
Neatly in Order – lifeofangela

Billy No Mates

Long time readers will know that I’m an avid fan of Ansel Adams. Sitting on my desk right now is a book called “Ansel Adams 400 Photographs”,  I’ve read it cover to cover, or to be more accurate, I’ve looked at every one of the 400 photographs included in the book. Several times over.

I can’t verbalize the internal meaning of pictures whatsoever. Some of my friends can at very mystical levels, but I prefer to say that, if I feel something strongly, I would make a photograph, that would be the equivalent of what I saw and felt. – Ansel Adams

I’m not at the mystical level. for me, nearly all of the photographs show a unique style and technical mastery, coupled with an amazing sense of composition.

So you might be asking “what’s this got to do with friends”? The answer is nothing and here’s the thing. I don’t photograph friends. If I’m socialising I don’t normally drag along my camera.

So instead here’s a few landscapes;

Starting with a quick one of the shore at Loch Lomond, Scotland. Actually it’s more like the exit from the marina into the loch. Go at the wrong time of the year  and you will fall foul of the voracious Scots Midgies. Trust me on this one I came away with a load of bites. You’d think that because I’m scots they would treat me differently and just go after the tourists. I mean where’s their loyalty.  Scots Wha Hae An Aaw That.

Loch Lomond

Right then, it’s off to the beach. Notice there are no friends here either. Definitely a case of “Billy No Mates” besides which they only get in the way of the photograph you are trying to take.

Prestatyn Beach

…and you’re not likely to find any friends in a field of straw bales at sunset. Just as well really because the midgies had taken up residence here.

Straw Bales

Two friends went out to play golf and were about to tee off, when one fellow noticed that his partner had but one golf ball.
“Don’t you have at least one other golf ball?”, he asked. The other guy replied that no, he only needed the one. “Are you sure?”, the friend persisted. “What happens if you lose that ball?” The other guy replied, “This is a very special golf ball. I won’t lose it so I don’t need another one.”
Well,” the friend asked, “what happens if you miss your shot and the ball goes in the lake?”
“That’s okay,” he replied, “this special golf ball floats. I’ll be able to retrieve it.”
“Well what happens if you hit it into the trees and it gets lost among the bushes and shrubs?”
The other guy replied, “That’s okay too. You see, this special golf ball has a homing beacon. I’ll be able to get it back — no problem.”
Exasperated, the friend asks, “Okay. Let’s say our game goes late, the sun goes down, and you hit your ball into a sand trap. What are you going to do then?”
“No problem,” says the other guy, “you see, this ball is fluorescent. I’ll be able to see it in the dark.”
Finally satisfied that he needs only the one golf ball, the friend asks, “Hey, where did you get a golf ball like that anyway?”
The other guy replies, “I found it.”

Corny I know but I had to include some reference to friends somewhere……and here he is. Deefer the Dog. One time friend, now long gone……

Deefer

Here’s what other blogger are saying about this weeks challenge;

Isabel Caves WPC- Turtles
Story Twigs the Imagination! Be a Friend – Read To Them
Yvette’s photography Friend
Grandma Monkey – Scribbles to Compositions
Weekly Photo Challenge – Friend – Celina2609’s Blog
Shots and captures Weekly Photo Challenge- Friend
Hammer Home True Colours
Friends for life, my mini me. – Phoenix Moon Creations
It’s REALLY Nothing – Wind Kisses
Two Girls and Giant Hotdogs – By Sarah