Weekly Photo Challenge: Creepy

Another week and another challenge. I suppose it’s inevitable that at some time the  challenge theme is going to repeat.  On the 1st of November 2013 Cheri asked us to write about something Eerie. It’s not too hard to jump from Eerie to Creepy which is this weeks challenge theme.

A long time ago I used to experiment with composite images and digital blending. Some of the creations I would come up with were quite creepy; like this one of a stone gargoyle from the side of a church blended with a set of human eyes. I was also into framing all of my work at the time.

Looking At You

Later I developed a more dark and sombre mood  as you can see from this next one.

The Red Monk

The good thing about this type of work; I was teaching myself to use Photoshop, blending  layers, lighting, brushes etc. All of which were to come in handy later. This next one was a composite of so many of those techniques I mentioned above. The background is a photograph of trees in the fog, layered with a blue cast and some dark textures. Next the girl was cut-out from her original background and blended into the photograph using a slightly transparent layer. Brushes were used for the lightning and the flying birds.

Girl in Blue

Talking of brushes. The next two works were created solely using Photoshop brushes. Oops! I tell a lie. The moon was mine. but everything else came from various Photoshop brushes

moonlit_blog2

Definitely all brushes this time. Can you see an underlying theme to all of these works?

graveyard_blog2

Finally, I give you… “Come Play With Me”. Once again, it’s a composite made of several layers of photographs combined with Photoshop brushes.

grunge industrial background

Here’s what other bloggers are writing about this subject;

https://cynthiamvoss.wordpress.com/2015/08/21/photo-challenge-creepy/
https://anadventures.wordpress.com/2015/08/20/creepy-monk/
https://theparanormalist.wordpress.com/2015/08/20/you-want-creepy-my-whole-blog-is-creepy/
http://abstractlucidity.com/2015/08/19/photo-challenge-creepy/
https://lulaharp.wordpress.com/2015/08/19/wpc-creepy/
https://beyondthebrushphotography.wordpress.com/2015/08/18/please-come-again/
https://gottatakemorepix.wordpress.com/2015/08/18/wpc-creepy/
https://jennsmidlifecrisis.wordpress.com/2015/08/18/weekly-photo-challenge-creepy/
http://mariamjohnson.com/wpc-creepy-not-creepy/
https://photoessayist.wordpress.com/2015/08/15/creepy-prehistoric-creature/

Hard Hitting Footage Of A Fatal Collision Between Motorcycle And Car

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO REBLOG OR SHARE THIS VIDEO

Norfolk Police in the UK have released hard-hitting footage of a fatal collision in a bid to get motorcyclists and drivers to think seriously about road safety.

WARNING – Viewers are warned that this video contains content which some may find distressing, but it does not show any graphic images of the rider during or after the collision. The decision is yours whether you want to watch it or not, I have, several times now, and I can’t stop thinking about it.

I don’t often publish anything like this but I feel the message has to get out there even to other countries.

#ThinkBike
#RideSafe

Topaz Glow

Over the last month I have been beta testing a new product from Topaz Labs called Glow. The software works either as a standalone program or as a plugin for Lightroom or Photoshop. Topaz Glow uses fractals to get some interesting results, very similar to Redfield Fractalius. Topaz have released a short product video showing the interface along with some before and after photographs.

I’m sure over the next few days there will be plenty of tutorials released so I’m just going to show you some of the results I achieved using Topaz Glow.

Electric Sky

Glow is not one of those plugins I would use on every photograph. I’m more likely to use it when I am creating some digital artwork and I want to bring in an electric sort of look. Topaz Glow has lots of ready-made presets that you can just click and apply but my personal method is to choose a preset and then adjust the sliders to get more of the look I want.

Engine Bay

Like this engine bay from a Ford. I still wanted to maintain a lot of the detail and by adjusting the opacity and blend modes of Topaz Glow directly in the plugin or standalone program I’m able to get the look I want. Similarly in the photograph below I used blending an opacity levels along with fine tuning the preset to maintain the ripples in the sand but add a bit of light and texture

Purple Haze

Applied carefully you can get a painterly look to your photograph. look at this one of a blue tit sitting on a branch.

Glow-Tit

Admittedly Topaz already have a paint plugin called Impressions but I quite like the effect that Glow brings to this photograph. The tree below is so simple but Topaz Glow has added just that little bit of texture

Tree

Disclaimer: I have been a beta tester for Topaz products for well over a year now and as such I am give copies of the software for testing which has often resulted in my receiving a free license when the product is brought to market.

Greg’s Postcard Made It To North Wales

A short while back Greg Urbano posted an article on his blog entitled Where In The World Is My Postcard? In the post Greg’s suggested that if we supplied a mailing address, in return he would send an autographed postcard.

Freebies. I’m up for that and as Greg wasn’t going to use my address for anything other than sending me the postcard, why not?

The postcard arrived today, Saturday 15th March and here it is featured in this photograph.

My Town

Greg suggested taking a photograph featuring the postcard, which I could mail to him. In turn he would write a blog post around my photograph with a link back to my blog.

Now that’s what I call “Sharing, Link Love”

So where am I? I’m standing on the top of Gwaenysgor hill looking towards my adopted home town of Prestatyn with it’s wide sandy beaches. Unfortunately, the wind is strong and cold and I was having trouble keeping the postcard still.

Prestatyn is a seaside resort, town and community in Denbighshire, Wales. It is located on the Irish Sea coast and has a population of around 18,496

There is evidence that the current town location has been occupied since prehistoric times. Prehistoric tools found in the caves of Craig Fawr, in the nearby village of Meliden, have revealed the existence of early human habitation in the area.

The Roman bathhouse is believed to be part of a fort on the road from Chester to Caernarfon. However, much of ‘Roman Prestatyn’ has been destroyed as houses have been built over un-excavated land.

The name Prestatyn derives from the Old English preosta (“priest”) and tun (“farm”), and was recorded in the Domesday Book as Prestetone. Unlike similarly derived names in England, which generally lost their penultimate syllable and became Preston, this village’s name developed a typically Welsh emphasis on the penultimate syllable and a modification of “ton” to “tyn”, as also happened at Mostyn. Although the Domesday Book only extended to demesnes in England, Prestatyn was included since it was at that time under English control.

An earth mound, visible in fields to the south of the railway station, near Nant Hall, marks the site of an early wooden motte and bailey castle, probably built by the Norman Robert de Banastre about 1157, which was destroyed by the Welsh under Owain Gwynedd in 1167. The Banastre family then moved to Bank Hall in Lancashire.

The town appears to have been primarily a fishing village for hundreds of years. The beginning and end of High Street today mark the location of two ‘maenolau’ (or manor houses) called Pendre (translated as “end of” or “top of town”) and Penisadre (“lower end of town”)

The town’s population remained at less than 1000 until the arrival of the railways and the holidaymakers in the 19th and 20th centuries. “Sunny Prestatyn” became famous for its beach, clean seas and promenade entertainers, and visiting for a bathe was considered very healthy by city-dwelling Victorians.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta
Vintage paper with plenty of copyspace for text

Digital Art

Vintage paper with plenty of copyspace for text

Way back in the dim and distant past I used to create a lot of images like this using backgrounds I had created and photographed. I would then add the subject such as the lighthouse and blend the two together.

In this one I have used a stock image from Fotolia and then blended in one of my photographs of Talacre Lighthouse.

I had forgotten how much fun it was, playing around in Photoshop to get the effect I wanted, blending layers and brushing in/out parts of the various photographs.

In fact I enjoyed it so much you might just see some more like this. But what do you think? Should I feature more digital art?