Tagged: sea

A Mixed Bag This Week

A bit of a mixed bag this week for the challenge. It’s strange how we all interpret a theme differently but this is how I see security. Weston-super-Mare has some fantastically wide and long beaches but it has one major failing. The tide goes out such a long distance and after the sand ends horrible thick cloying mud is exposed, the low tide mark in Weston Bay is about 1 mile (1.6 km) from the seafront. Trust me you don’t want to walk into it. you sink quickly and can immediately be up to your knees. Now here’s the worrying part. The tide that went out so far comes back in at a really fast speed and it’s unforgiving. If you’re stuck in the mud, and each year people do, you’d better hope the Rescue Team get to you in time, because Weston-super-Mare has one of the highest tidal rises in the world as much as 48ft (14.5m).

So for people’s own security and safety there are signs all along the beach warning of the dangers of sinking mud, and yet they are often ignored.

Danger Sinking Mud

Still in Weston-super-Mare. Because of those fast, incoming tides it is all too easy to get caught out. Take a look at the photograph below. On the causeway between Knightstone Island and WSM the tide often surges over the top. Now Knightstone really isn’t an island anymore. There is a perfectly good road which loops round the sea-front and is not much longer than the causeway. So there’s no need to put yourself in danger by walking across when the tide is coming in. Remember, it’s a fast tide that rises a considerable height. Look at the little dog on the lead. it’s been turned around by the waves. At this point she was halfway across and fortunately she made it safely……..

Washed Away

……and here’s the same causeway on a wild and stormy night.

Stormy Night

Further along the coast is Uphill Beach. You can walk from WSM to Uphill and it’s a really nice walk with sand dunes and of course long sandy beaches. Here they have a similar problem with mud, but there’s also an additional problem on the beach – boy racers. You can drive on Uphill beach and often the idiots will come on and start tearing up and down at a fair old speed. Supposedly there is a speed limit of 15mph but they don’t pay attention to that. So there are signs warning beach goers about the mud and speeding cars.. The local farmer makes a small amount of money each year towing cars out of the mud before the tide comes in. I’ve even towed a family car out that got stuck in soft sand.

Uphill Beach

I took this photograph a long time ago and it’s an old lighthouse at Burnham-on-Sea. further along the coast from WSM. Since I took this the steps have been repaired but it’s a long time since I’ve been to Burnham- so I can’t really say if the lighthouse is still in good repair.

The Tower

Although they have weapons, I think these guards are more for show than anything else. This is a popular tourist spot – Prague Castle.

On Guard

Anyway that’s it for this week and like I said a bit of a mixed bag which hopefully convey some meaning around security.

Here’s what other bloggers are saying about this weeks challenge.

Margaretakirken – artishorseshit
By Tram, Escalator and Ferry- Hong Konging it – psychologistmimi
phoetryartwrasana Catalyst
This is Another Story A Special Necklace
Hot Dogs and Marmalade New Use for an iPod
This, that and the other thing Weekly Photo Challenge- Security…the One
Half a photograph Security
Weekly Photo Challenge- Security – nancy merrill photography
Weekly Photo Challenge. Security. – The Digital Teacup
Photography Journal Blog Weekly Photo Challenge- Security

Talacre Dunes

Another post, using the new theme and the WordPress servers to host the photographs. Most comments said everything was OK but “It’s Just A Theory” reported having problems displaying the photographs. So could you please check and let me know if the images are displaying with the post and that you don’t have to click a link or a thumbnail to see them. Thanks in advance for checking.

So this week it’s Graceful. Those people in Automatic sure pick some weird themes at times but here we go.

The sand dunes at Talacre have always been my goto place when I want to test new equipment or a particular method of taking photographs.

Talacre Sand Dunes

Wandering amongst the dunes gives me plenty of scope to photograph wildlife, like this jay which was sitting on one of the trees that are dotted around the dunes. Beautiful birds, very intelligent and this photograph in winter plumage really doesn’t do the colours justice.

Jay

And wherever you go your sure to find little Blue Tits at the edges of the dunes, hiding in the trees. Although not this one, quite cheeky, but very nervous and surprisingly this one came quite close.

Blue Tit

However, back to the dunes, There are certain areas were a lot of conservation work is going on so you will find these areas fenced off.

Dune Protection

It may be for a rare species of plant or wildlife. Sometimes it’s just to protect the ever-changing infrastructure. Sand dunes are very susceptible to damage by us and of course the wind. I never question it. If it’s fenced off, it’s for a reason, so I see no need to enter, even if it means I have to go a longer way round.

Finally you can’t go to Talacre without taking a photograph of the abandoned lighthouse. But this time rather than go onto the beach I’ve stayed in the dunes to give me some foreground interest.

Talacre Lighthouse

Is it graceful? It might be but hey, my post my choice of photographs. Do they fit the theme….of course they do.

As usual, here’s what other bloggers are saying about this weeks challenge;

Yvette’s photography Graceful
PhotosbyGoldie Graceful in Repose
Photoessayist The Blog Graceful- A Richard Serra Sculpture
A Certain Slant of Light Photography Underwater Grace
Flight of a Seagull
Anvica’s gallery Graceful
Half a photograph Graceful
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Vietnamese Girl in Ao Dai – Nes Felicio Photography
Sara Doolittle Gracefulness, air, and water

Weekly Photo Challenge: Local

Over the years I have written about many of the places I have visited in North Wales but never really shown you much of where I live; Prestatyn. It’s a typical small town bordered on one side by the sea and on the other by a range of hills, which are supposed to protect us from the harsher winter elements. Do they? Don’t know, but when all around gets snow we don’t see a lot in Prestatyn. But there again we do live by the sea and that’s always good, too much salt in the air for snow and ice to settle.

Anyway to the photographs. Prestatyn High street is typical of many small towns you can find, some empty units, some that never seem busy and some quite bustling. What more can I say.

High Street

There is evidence that the area around Prestatyn was settled in prehistoric finds with artifacts found in caves nearby. The Romans were definitely here as there are still the remains of a bath house to be found situated in the midst of a housing estate. No other Roman buildings exist, probably because the land they may have been buried under was excavated and built on. More on that later.

High on the hill above Prestatyn there lies a bronze sculpture of one side of a Roman legionnaires helmet. With the existence of the bath house it is thought that Prestatyn was probably the site of a Roman fort on the road from Chester to Caernarfon.

Roman Helmet

The sad thing is most people in Prestatyn probably don’t even know it exists , especially as it’s sited an area that very few visitors to the town would venture to. Still staying with old Prestatyn. Up until the arrival of the railway and holidaymakers in the 19th and 20 century the population of Prestatyn was very small. But Prestatyn had something that city dwelling Victorians considered very healthy; fresh air, clean seas, fantastic beaches and promenade entertainers. Prestatyn suddenly became a very popular place to visit.

Nowadays most of the tourists have gone but we still have fresh air, clean seas and the fantastic beaches that stretch for miles and miles. We also get some amazing sunsets….

Long Beaches

If you look in the photograph above you can see to the right a small object sticking up from the sea. It’s a marker for part of the sea defences which become submerged when the tide comes in. But when it goes out you can walk out to those markers and sometimes beyond. So not only are our beaches long, they’re also wide.

Beach Marker

However, we also get exceptionally high tides several times a year and our sea defences have to be able to cope not only with the high tide but also a storm surge if the wind whips the sea up even higher, Unfortunately a couple of years ago the defences were breached just a little bit further up the coast and many houses were flooded.

Stormy Seas

Although Prestatyn is a small town the surrounding area is very rural so we sort of have the benefits of both worlds.

Evening Sunset

 

Dechrau a Diwedd

Back to the sea again, it’s the best part and those sunsets….what more can I say.

That’s it for this week, here’s what other bloggers are saying about this weeks challenge.

Sky Blue Daze How to be a street performer
Shots and captures Weekly Photo Challenge- Local
Fife Photos & Art Greenside Cottages, Leslie
The Photographer Smiled… Our celebrity
DAVID OAKES -IMAGES. Colours of Autumn.. (Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge – Local 2)
Penne 4 Your Thoughts Exploring the Waverton coal loader
Photocracy Sukkah
Gwyncurbygodwin’s Blog LITTLE RED CHICKEN HOUSE
Coffee fuels my photography! So Local they made themselves at home! (WPC- Local)
Weekly Photo Challenge- Local – Angela Kay

Weekly Photo Challenge: Partners

I’m all at sea this week, not me personally, just the photographs. For this weeks challenge we’re going just off the coast of Prestatyn, my home town. So let’s make a start. First up is a partnership between the Rhyl Lifeboat and an Royal Air Force Rescue Helicopter. Sadly we won’t see this anymore as the aging fleet of Sea King helicopters are being phased out and Helicopter Rescue Services are now done by a civilian contractor. In this case it’s just an exercise. practicing transfer to and from the lifeboat. I’ll miss the big yellow helicopters as we often would see them in the Snowdonia National Park.

Rescue Me

On to another partnership, this time between Wales and Ireland. The Nostag is a cable laying ship which is putting in place the undersea power cable which will allow the two countries to share electricity resources. The cable is dropped into an underground trench and then remote vehicles fill the trench in.

Nostag

OK! Not strictly at sea with this one but everyone calls them sea gulls. In reality, their Herring Gulls and a damn nuisance. They’re urban flying rats, raiding bins, attacking other birds, crapping all over roofs and cars, attacking people during the breeding season and just after. Yet, nothing can be done about them, in the UK they are a protected species. But the chick s ar kind of cute and make for a good photograph, as long as you use a long lens and keep your distance. The parents will take it turn about to sit on the nest whilst the eggs are hatching and then once hatched, one or the other will stay very close whilst the other goes in search of food.

Proud Parents

My final photograph this week is from a competition involving fast little boats call ZapCats. It takes two people, one to steer and the other to balance out weight distribution as these little boats hurtle around a pre-determined course.

Zapcats

Well, that’s it for this week and I hope you enjoyed the photographs. As usual, here’s what other bloggers are saying about this weeks challenge.

Wall of Fusions Freedom is Escapade
Partners in – – Lisa Jill Singh
Loving Couples – Weekly Photo Challenge
Elizabatz Gallery Weekly Photo Challenges- Partners
Half a photograph Music
Claudia Curici Photography What a day…
hereisandrea weekly photo challenge- partners
Giggles & Tales Partners – Weekly Photo Challenge!
The Everyday Photographer by J.E. Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge- Partners
West Sac Photographer Partners

Weekly Photo Challenge: Half Light

It’s Sunday morning, here in the UK. Overnight our clocks went forward one hour whilst most of us were sleeping, so we are officially in British Summer Time. This year marks the 100th anniversary of this twice yearly event where the clocks go forward in Spring and backwards in Winter, which means that for now evenings have more daylight and mornings have less. Britain is one of a few countries around the world that observes a daylight saving time. Why do we do it? Well it all started during the First World War

  • Germany and it’s ally Austria-Hungary were the first to introduce Daylight Saving Time, on 30 April 1916, as a way to conserve coal during wartime
  • On the 17th May 1916 the British government followed suit, passing the Summer Time Act in Parliament

It is light that reveals, light that obscures, light that communicates. It is light I “listen” to. The light late in the day has a distinct quality, as it fades toward the darkness of evening. After sunset there is a gentle leaving of the light, the air begins to still, and a quiet descends. I see magic in the quiet light of dusk. I feel quite, yet intense energy in the natural elements of our habitat. A sense of magic prevails. A sense of mystery. It is a time for contemplation, for listening – a time for making photographs. – John Sexton

Menai Strait

I took the photograph above at Caernarfon late one evening after the sun had set. I wasn’t really interested in the foreground but the pattern and colour of the clouds did really interest me.

Blue Hour in the evening happens once the sun has dropped a good distance below the horizon and what little light is left happens to take on a blueish sort of hue. It’s a good time to take photographs which are different from the normal reds, oranges and purples of a sunset. As Pete Bridgwood says;

Landscape photographers are crepuscular creatures, we tend to function most creatively at twilight, be it dawn or dusk.

Causeway

…and that’s probably true. I find my best photographs tend to be in the evening as the sun is setting and living on the coast there’s always the chance to capture a good sunset out to sea, especially in the Spring, Summer and early Autumn.

You only get one sunrise and one sunset a day, and you only get so many days on the planet. A good photographer does the math and doesn’t waste either. – Galen Rowell

Purple Sky

Sometimes though you can go inland and capture something completely different. The photograph below was taken on the banks of the Grand Western Canal which was completed in 1814. I hadn’t really gone out with the intention of taking a photograph, we were using the canal towpath to get to a local pub, but along the way the sky just lit up and it was really too good an opportunity to miss. No tripod here, just a steady hand, a 1/30s exposure and my wife’s shoulder as a brace.

The Canal

More local this time in a field very near to my house. I had seen the bales being cut during the day and thought it would be good for a sunset photograph. So suitably armed with a tripod I wandered around the field looking for a good viewpoint. The sun was setting to my right and flooding everything with an orange glow.

Hay Bales

My final photograph is of Tewkesbury Abbey which is a joy to photograph both inside and out. But Tewkesbury has a dark history. After the Battle of Tewkesbury in the Wars of the Roses on 4 May 1471, some of the defeated Lancastrians sought sanctuary in the abbey. The victorious Yorkists, led by King Edward IV, forced their way into the abbey; the resulting bloodshed caused the building to be closed for a month until it could be purified and re-consecrated.

Tewkesbury Abbey

Out on the green I was looking for some foreground interest and finally found this lone bench some distance from the abbey. Even although it was some distance away I wanted to include it just to give that added something.

Finally I’d like to talk about Luminosity Masks. Last week I wrote an article about how I’d finally given up on trying to work with this method of post processing photographs and yet all of the photographs you see in this weeks post were processed using Luminosity Masks. Why? Over on Facebook I’m a member of a group called Luminosity Masking and last week I put up some photographs challenging the group to convince me that LM’s really worked in practice. Terry Tedor came up with a very well worded explanation of how he used LM’s to produce a photograph, which forced me to rethink how I should use Luminosity Masks. The results you can see here.

Here’s what other bloggers are writing about this weeks challenge.

Geriatri’x’ Fotogallery Half Light at Lukuba Island
Photo Challenge – Half-Light
JAMAC Photography Dawn
Ann Edwards Photography Weekly Photo Challenge – Half – Light
derwentvalleyphotography Weekly photo challenge- Half-light
Wolverson Photography Half-Light
A Certain Slant of Light Photography Half Light
Jude’s Photography Weekly Photo Challenge- Half Light
Schelley Cassidy Photography Half-Light- Nature’s Abstract Art
corleyfoto Weekly Photo Challenge- Half-Light