Weekly Photo Challenge: Masterpiece


Over the last few months I have had intermittent problems with my broadband resulting in unexplained drop-outs, reduction in bandwidth, slow access and on some days inability to even connect to the internet. This week it all came to a head and I’ve finally managed to get my provider to admit that there could be a problem, correction, there is a problem. Anyway we have an engineer booked for Monday afternoon (who didn’t turn up). At the moment I have a connection speed slightly less than a dial-up modem but it should let me get this weeks blog entry out, providing it stay up long enough, whilst I finish writing this article…..and so to this weeks challenge. My apologies if I don’t reply to your comments immediately. I have been told an engineer will diagnose and repair the problem on Thursday. I await with bated breath.

Photography : so many attempts – so few masterpieces – James Elliott – 2001

Most of my photography these days is in the beautiful landscape that is the Snowdonia National Park.

Much of the terrain is rough, isolated, absolutely beautiful and dangerous no matter what time of the year.

Snowdonia (Welsh: Eryri) is a region in North Wales and a national park of 823 square miles (2,130 km2) in area. It was the first to be designated of the three National Parks in Wales, in 1951

More than 26,000 people live within the Park, of whom about 62% can speak at least some Welsh. The Park attracts over 6 million visitors annually, split almost equally between day and staying visitors, making it the third most visited National Park in England and Wales.

Many of the hikers in the area concentrate on Snowdon itself. It is regarded as a fine mountain, but can become quite crowded, particularly with the Snowdon Mountain Railway running to the summit.

The Park has 1,479 miles (2,380 km) of public footpaths, 164 miles (264 km) of public bridleways, and 46 miles (74 km) of other public rights of way. A large part of the Park is also covered by Right to Roam laws.

Snowdonia is one of the wettest parts of the British Isles; this means there are many lakes in the National Park.

For me, Snowdonia is one of the most beautiful, yet rugged, places in the world. Every time I venture into the National Park I find something new to photograph. What more could I ask for?

Whilst i await with bated breath and OpenReach Engineer coming to fix my telephone line, I thought I would take a short trip to Glasgow. So early start tomorrow, hopefully I might be able to catch the sun setting over Loch Lomond.

13 Comments

  1. Beauiful beautiful photos! I hope the tech guy can sort out the problem & I am really looking forward to your photos of Lich Lomond. Spent 3 days camping on the shores there a long time ago.

    Like

    1. Still waiting, they failed to turn up and the appointment was rescheduled without consultation for tomorrow. Weather wasn’t that great at Loch Lomond but I managed to get maybe one or two useable photographs

      Like

  2. Such a beautiful and rugged area. I had no idea the park is so huge. The photos are beautiful as usual. Your work really is top notch. And I hope that your Internet problems are soon resolved.

    Like

    1. It’s a great place to explore, Yvonne, and combined with the Denbigh moors we have some very remote and rugged countryside that we can photograph. Still waiting for the telecom guys. My broadband link is down more than its up at the moment, frustrating to say the least

      Like

  3. Inspiring images, Mike from a wonderful part of the world. I have a friend in Karachi who is also having similar internet connection problems – you may be in the same line!

    Like

  4. I’ve been very lucky to spend some time in Snowdonia this year, it really is stunning. Don’t worry, internet connection is just as bad here in South Wales! Pob lwc 🙂

    Like

Comments are closed.